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Roz Plant - Textile Artist specialising in Batik & Surface Design

Sally in the Sea - Batik on Cotton - Quilted - W40 x H 100cm
Johnny on a Wall - Batik on Silk - 25cm x 25cm
Dog & 2 Cats - Batik on Cotton - 25cm x25 cm
Squirell - Batik on Cotton - 40cm x40cm
Dog with Curly Tail - Batik on Cotton - W 70 cm X H 100 cm

Biography

Roz Plant

Born in Lincolnshire, Lincoln College of Art 1978-79, Loughborough College of Art 1979-1982-BA Hons Degree in Printed Textiles. When I left art college I didn't want to produce design on paper for screen printed fabrics because it is the process of putting dye onto cloth that I love so I began handpainting my own designs on cloth then making them up into clothes, scarves, hangings and 3 dimensional works. I moved to Dumfries & Galloway in 1989 and settled in Wigtownshire. South West Scotland never ceases to inspire me, animals, birds, insects, hills, forests and the sea and friendly people too. I moved to New Abbey in 2006 where I work, mainly in Batik,but also other textile arts and drawing. In May 2008 Phil Gibson and I opened the doors to our artists workshop in New Abbey to the public and we continue to open most afternoons throughout the year (weather permitting).

    Artist Details

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Medium

  • Batik (wax & dyes),textiles

Location

  • Dumfries & Galloway

Membership

Artwork Sales

  • This artist currently does not have prints for sale

Recent Exhibitions

From May 2008- present, permanen,t ever changing and occasionally interactive exhibition in the open workshop in I share with painter & ceramacist Phil Gibson.
1996-One woman show in Newton Stewart
1992-Celtik Batik at The Netherbow, Edinburgh
1992-Rufford Craft Gallery, Notts
1984-Scunthorpe Art Gallery

Other Information

I fell in love with the process over 26 years ago, drawing on cloth with hot wax is a very physical art form, especially when doing large pieces and the need to move quickly while the wax is hot is liberating and gives me freedom of expression and an escape route for my impatient soul. I usually use procien dyes after the wax is applied. Air temperature and humidity make a lot of difference to the strength of colour I can achieve but the unpredicatability of the end result is exciting. If I am disappointed when I've boiled a piece to remove the wax, I am then given the challenge of adding embroidery, beading, surface design or even biro to turn it into something I am pleased with. I am basically a draughtswoman who has a passion for textiles. With Batik I can combine them both.

Current Exhibition -





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